Wolves In The Dark By Gunnar Staalesen #blogtour

wolves blog tour poster (1)

Synopsis

PI Varg Veum fights for his reputation, his freedom and his life, when child pornography is found on his computer and he is arrested and jailed. Worse still, his memory is a blank…

Reeling from the death of his great love, Karin, Varg Veum’s life has descended into a self-destructive spiral of alcohol, lust, grief and blackouts.

When traces of child pornography are found on his computer, he’s accused of being part of a paedophile ring and thrown into a prison cell. There, he struggles to sift through his past to work out who is responsible for planting the material… and who is seeking the ultimate revenge.

When a chance to escape presents itself, Varg finds himself on the run in his hometown of Bergen. With the clock ticking and the police on his tail, Varg takes on his hardest – and most personal – case yet.

wolves in the dark cover

My review

This was my first time of reading a Gunnar Staalesen novel. This is the eighth book in the PI varg Veum series and it can totally be read as a stand alone book, although saying this, in completing it I’m now really interested to find out more about Varg and will be downloading the other seven in the series. I must admit I am quite getting into Nordic noir novels and really starting to enjoy them.

I was slightly apprehensive about the subject of this novel, child pornography is obviously not a subject that sits comfortably as a bedtime read, it’s a very prickly, uncomfortable subject to read about. However, Gunnar manages to only go into enough detail for you to understand the plot without it being too harrowing to read.

The whole story is full of twists and turns that have you wondering, how on earth Varg Veum could have got himself into such a situation. It is obvious that the beginning of this book finds Varg in a very dark place after the death of his girlfriend Karin. This, in particular, made me want to find out more about the circumstances that surrounded her death and the path that leads Varg to where this story begins.

The story is fast moving and full of blood rushing, adrenalin pumping scenario’s, it’s finished off with a fantastic twist that has you thinking back over the story to see if there were any clues you had missed, I for one definitely did not foresee the ending. This is an absolute 5* review from me.

About the Author

Gunnar Staalesen was born in Bergen, Norway in 1947. He made his debut at the age of 22 with Seasons of Innocence and in 1977 he published the first book in the Varg Veum series. He is the author of over 20 titles, which have been published in 24 countries and sold over four million copies. Twelve film adaptations of his Varg Veum crime novels have appeared since 2007, starring the popular Norwegian actor Trond Epsen Seim. Staalesen, who has won three Golden Pistols (including the Prize of Honour), lives in Bergen with his wife. When Prince Charles visited Bergen, Staalesen was appointed his official tour guide. There is a life-sized statue of Varg Veum in the centre of Bergen, and a host of Varg Veum memorabilia for sale. We Shall Inherit the Wind and Where Roses Never Die were both international bestsellers. Don Bartlett is the foremost translator of Norwegian, responsible for the multaward- winning, bestselling books by Jo Nesbo, Karl Ove Knausgaard and Per Pettersen. It is rare to have a translator who is as well-known and highly regarded as the author.

Wolves in the dark is due to be published by Orenda books on 15th June 2017

I’d like to thank Orenda Books & Anne Cater for allowing me to review Wolves in the dark.

Click here to buy Wolves in the dark

 

Museum Of You by Carys Bray

museum of you

Synopsis

Clover Quinn was a surprise. She used to imagine she was the good kind, now she’s not sure. She’d like to ask Dad about it, but growing up in the saddest chapter of someone else’s story is difficult. She tries not to skate on the thin ice of his memories.

Darren has done his best. He’s studied his daughter like a seismologist on the lookout for waves and surrounded her with everything she might want – everything he can think of, at least – to be happy.

What Clover wants is answers. This summer, she thinks she can find them in the second bedroom, which is full of her mother’s belongings. Volume isn’t important, what she is looking for is essence; the undiluted bits: a collection of things that will tell the full story of her mother, her father and who she is going to be.

But what you find depends on what you’re searching for.

My Review

The museum of you is a lovely novel and the characters within its pages are warm, believable and real. Clover is likeable and really sweet with very much her own mind. Darren is hard working, the love for is daughter is very apparent.

The story is told in a way that you can relate to Clover and her need to find out about her mother, who died shortly after Clover is born. and Darren’s reluctance and need to protect Clover from the details.

Clover wants to know about her Mother which leads her to investigate the spare bedroom where Darren has kept all of Becky’s things. Clover decides to turn this room into a museum of memorabilia surrounding Becky’s life. A surprise for her Dad and a way for her to get to know her Mother in the process.

The truth surrounding the circumstances of Becky’s death slowly emerges. The ending is perfect and finishes on a high!

Click here to buy A museum of you

All about the author

Carys Bray

Carys Bray’s debut collection Sweet Home won the Scott prize and selected stories were broadcast on BBC Radio Four Extra. Her first novel A Song for Issy Bradley was serialised on BBC Radio Four’s Book at Bedtime and was shortlisted for the Costa Book Awards, the Association of Mormon Letters Awards, the Waverton Good Read Award, the 15 Bytes Book Awards and the Desmond Elliott Prize. It won the Utah Book Award and the Authors’ Club Best First Novel Award and was selected for the 2015 Richard and Judy Summer Book Club. Her second novel The Museum of You was published in June 2016.

Carys has a BA in Literature from The Open University and an MA and PhD in Creative Writing from Edge Hill University. She is working on a third novel.

Head over to Cary’s website

Follow Carys on Twitter

The Little Breton Bistro by Nina George

little-breton-bistro

Synopsis

Marianne Messman longs to escape her loveless marriage to an uncaring husband – an artillery sergeant major named Lothar. On a day trip to Paris, Marianne decides to leap off the Pont Neuf into the Seine, but she is saved from drowning by a homeless man. While recovering in hospital, Marianne comes across a painting of the tiny port town of Kerdruc in Brittany and decides to try her luck on the coast.

In Kerdruc, Marianne meets a host of colourful characters who all gravitate around the restaurant of Ar Mor (The Sea). It is this cast of true Bretons who become Marianne’s new family, and among whom she will find love once again. But with her husband looking to pull her back to her old life, Marianne is left with a choice: to step back into the known, or to take a huge jump into an exciting and unpredictable future.

My Review

The little Paris bookshop also by Nina George is on my TRB pile, well after reading The little Breton Bistro it has been rapidly moved to the top!

The book surrounds the life of Marianne and her escape to a new life. The book begins as Marianne decides she can no longer live her loveless life, controlled and down trodden by her husband she feels her only option is to take her own life. With a beginning like this i feared the story would be a rather sad one. I was very wrong, yes there are sad moments in this book but there are also uplifting and beautiful moments too.

As different characters are introduced you gradually untangle the web of lives within the story. You learn the background of each new character as there story goes alongside Marianne’s.

I was rooting for Marianne all the way through, urging her to grab the new life she had found.

A truly beautiful story with descriptions of France so real if you closed your eyes you could almost imagine you were there.

Thank you to Netgalley , Little, brown book group & Abacus books for allowing me to review this book.Click here to buy

Mad girl by Bryony Gordon

I had never heard of Bryony Gordon and then I stumbled upon Mad girl in the latest Richard & Judy reads. The cover caught my eye and when I read the blurb it became the top of my 2017 ‘to be read’ list.

Growing up I suffered with awful anxieties and mental health issues which really shadowed my childhood, adolescent and early adulthood. At the time there wasn’t the support there is now, luckily I had a great family doctor who seemed to understand or partly understood what I was going through, and instead of making me feel daft he actually listened and tried to shed some light on the constant turmoil I was going through.

Reading ‘Mad girl’ was slightly like reading an autobiography of my life! I laughed out loud at some of Bryony’s stories, to the point that I took the book to the hairdressers with me and literally spat my coffee out at one point! This book made me sigh a big sigh of relief, finally there was a name for the turmoil I’d suffered all those years ago, OCD. I wasn’t alone! There are other Mad Girls & men out there! 

I, like Bryony, never see myself as cured, I handle my OCD now, it sits within a secure box in my mind, it’s been asleep now for years but occasionally it stirs, I hear it starting to wake but I’m clever now & manage to secure the box before it has a chance to open it.

I’d recommend this book to everyone, it makes you laugh, cry & sometimes spit out coffee!

The trophy child by Paula Daly

twist. A great suspense thriller.
I have walked around like a zombie for the last week whilst reading ‘The Trophy Child’, mainly because I literally could not put it down and had way too many late nights just wanting to finish a chapter! The story had me gripped and the ending was a great unexpected twist.
Karen is a ‘tiger mum’, she pushes Bronte to the limit with out of school activities and extra tuition. Noel, Karen’s husband buries his head in the sand and throws himself into his work & the occasional extra marital dalliance

Verity, Noels’s daughter from his first marriage lives with them, Verity’s Mum has MS and is in a care home. Verity mildly puts up with Karen but her anger tends to over flow when she witnesses how horrible Bronte’s life is becoming at the hands of her Step Mum.

Everything changes on the day Bronte disappears, it starts a whole domino effect of events. Everyone comes under scrutiny and the family is never the same again, but this isn’t entirely a bad thing!

Little sisters by Isabel Ashdown

I was lucky enough to read a three chapter sample of Little sister. All I can say is wow! I was hooked from the first page and gutted when it ended.

The story Centres around two sisters, Jess and Emily. It’s New Year’s Eve & Jess is baby sitting for Emily’s one year old daughter Daisy. 2am Emily returns with her husband James, Daisy is gone, Jess is unconscious on the floor covered in blood…………

My kindle copy has been ordered, Due outApril 27th

Isolation junction by Jennifer Gilmour

I was kindly given this book to review by Jennifer

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Great book about a subject that needs publicity.

Rose is in an abusive relationship. Isolation junction follows her story from falling in love with Darren to the slow demise of the relationship as Darren reveals his true colours.

As Rose’s story unfolds she becomes isolated from her friends & family. Her self confidence is non existence, she can’t see a way out. Jennifer shows that with courage & support there is life after an abusive relationship. Well worth a read.

 

Click here to buy Isolation Junction